Giphy Gif Search Engine Rolls Out Private Artist Profiles To Help Organize, Monetize The Gif Community

Posted: May 22, 2013 in GT
Tags: , , ,

20130522-225219.jpg
Gifs, man! They’re trending harder than Jennifer Lawrence right now, but that doesn’t mean that
finding them is the easiest thing in the world. That’s
why Giphy, a startup that launched out of betaworks last month, is rolling out new tools to build out its library of awesome, high-quality gifs. See, Giphy is a gif search engine. It lets you search
by keyword for any gif you could possibly want, and
then saves load time and keeps things snappy by
only playing the gif once you hover over one of the
results. But sourcing the gifs you want is just the
first step in organizing the community, which is the true goal behind Giphy. That said, the startup is today rolling out private artist accounts, which will bake attribution right into the gifs
they create. The team has been looking for some of the most prominent gif creators and artists out there, and
has chosen twelve to give private artists accounts. As it stands now, there are hundreds of thousands of gifs floating around the internet. Most of them end up on
a tumblr somewhere, while others are created and shared through dozens of other platforms. But when you
come upon a great gif, perhaps on #Whatshouldwecallme, do you ever think about the dude that created said gif? Probably not, but you should. It would be like not thinking of Rhianna every time you heard the song “Umbrella.” “What we’re seeing in the beginning of organizing the community,” said founder Jace Cooke. “We want to give
these folks a home and connect them to publishers and brands. This will give them a following in a way that
will help them monetize their work.” But artists profiles are only the first step in organizing the gif community. Giphy is also building out an API,
which will be open in the next couple weeks. This lays the groundwork for Giphy to be used in other interesting
applications as the gif craze heats up. According to betaworks, the Giphy API has received much more
demand than the company has decided yet to meet, as they’re figuring out the best way to roll out access to
the platform. The third and final goal at the moment is for Giphy to create stronger relationships with publishers who are
using gifs for their content. Giphy has an automatic embed code for each gif, which publishers can use on
their own sites. It’s simple, but these relationships are crucial in elevating gif artists on a pedestal where they
can reach brands and monetize their work. As it stands now, private artists accounts are being rationed out at Giphy’s discretion. But what about the competition? Well, Giphy doesn’t have much competition outside of the wide world of
tumblr gifs. But even with the newfound focus on creation (re: artists accounts), Giphy doesn’t see much of a
threat in Vine or Cinemagram or any of the other user-generated gif makers. “There’s a nice social component to services like Vine and Instagram, but the validity of image on Instagram
is pretty limited outside of a circle of friends,” said Cooke. It’s pretty rare for a Vine or Cinemagram to surpass
being valid to friends and be an interesting piece of media in their own right.” That said, Giphy will continue to focus on high-level gif creation that provides content that’s accessible to a
large majority of people on the internet, as opposed to needing social context. Expect big things from this one, guys. Gifs aren’t going anywhere soon, and Giphy has made itself the portal.

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  11. FORT MEADE, Md. (AFNS) It was less than 90 days after Sept. 11, 2001, and nerves were still raw. Capt. Allison Black had landed in Uzbekistan just hours earlier and was headed towards her first combat mission in Afghanistan. A C130H gunship navigator assigned to the 1st Special Operations Group, her assignment was to plot routes, communicate with ground forces and identify targets in the darkness below.Bearded special forces soldiers were traveling on horseback armed with intelligence gained from Afghan Northern Alliance soldiers and Black and her crew were there to use high caliber rounds to create a problem for the Taliban.The gunship had begun to take antiaircraft fire from the Taliban, even though they had initially destroyed a bank of rocket launchers and several enemy trucks. With help from the Northern Alliance, and their general, Abdul Rashid Dostum, they identified a nearby safehouse hiding more than 200 Taliban and al Qaida soldiers.As they approached their target, Black’s voice shattered the silence over the special forces soldiers’ field radios. The Northern Alliance general was in disbelief when he heard a woman’s voice over the radio: “A woman, sent to kill the Taliban.” Black said that he thought it was the funniest thing.But with more than 400 40mm cannon and 100 105mm howitzer rounds on target, and more than 200 of the enemy killed, Black quickly was dubbed the “angel of death” by her Afghan counterparts.Black said the Afghan general dialed into the Taliban frequency and told the enemy, “America is so determined, they bring their women to kill the Taliban. It is the ‘angel of death’ raining fire upon you.”For her actions, Black was one of six Airmen to receive the first Air Force Combat Action Medal in a ceremony in front of the Air Force Memorial in Washington. She was the first Air Force woman to receive a combat medal.Then Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. T. Michael Moseley, spoke of Black and her fellow recipients: “The medal ties the Airmen of today engaged with enemy hostiles to the legacy of courage, valor service and sacrifice that our predecessors left us. These Airmen, like all Airmen, stand on the shoulders of giants like Billy Mitchell, Arnold, Chennault, Doolittle, Lemay and Schriever.” He concluded by saying, “Today we recognize these six amazing Airmen for their combat roles as warriors wielding the air power bequeathed to us by these giants.”Following the ceremony, Black told the audience, “It’s a great honor anytime you’re recognized for your efforts, but I don’t look at it as heroic. I’m proud to represent all of the Airmen who will receive this award.”Since that day in 2001 that established Black’s legacy, she has become a master navigator with more than 1,500 flying hours and 540 combat hours during Operation Enduring Freedom.During a recent CNN interview with Black, concerning the president’s announcement to open all military career fields to women, she commented that, “I think it there’s going to be the standard and the standard needs to remain the same. You need to be physically, mentally and technically capable to do whatever job it is. And if you can meet those standards, bring it. You know, gender aside, we have to prepare our forces for the future fight. And it’s dynamic. It’s evolving, everchanging. So introducing women into those key roles will be might be that critical punch we need to deliver to the future enemy.”An example that the Afghan general back in 2001 predicted for women of his own country: “Look at what America allows their women to do.FORT MEADE, Md. (AFNS) It was less than 90 days after Sept. 11, 2001, and nerves were still raw. Capt. Allison Black had landed in Uzbekistan just hours earlier and was headed towards her first combat mission in Afghanistan. A C130H gunship navigator assigned to the 1st Special Operations Group, her assignment was to plot routes, communicate with ground forces and identify targets in the darkness below.Bearded special forces soldiers were traveling on horseback armed with intelligence gained from Afghan Northern Alliance soldiers and Black and her crew were there to use high caliber rounds to create a problem for the Taliban.The gunship had begun to take antiaircraft fire from the Taliban, even though they had initially destroyed a bank of rocket launchers and several enemy trucks. With help from the Northern Alliance, and their general, Abdul Rashid Dostum, they identified a nearby safehouse hiding more than 200 Taliban and al Qaida soldiers.As they approached their target, Black’s voice shattered the silence over the special forces soldiers’ field radios. The Northern Alliance general was in disbelief when he heard a woman’s voice over the radio: “A woman, sent to kill the Taliban.” Black said that he thought it was the funniest thing.But with more than 400 40mm cannon and 100 105mm howitzer rounds on target, and more than 200 of the enemy killed, Black quickly was dubbed the “angel of death” by her Afghan counterparts.Black said the Afghan general dialed into the Taliban frequency and told the enemy, “America is so determined, they bring their women to kill the Taliban. It is the ‘angel of death’ raining fire upon you.”For her actions, Black was one of six Airmen to receive the first Air Force Combat Action Medal in a ceremony in front of the Air Force Memorial in Washington. She was the first Air Force woman to receive a combat medal.Then Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. T. Michael Moseley, spoke of Black and her fellow recipients: “The medal ties the Airmen of today engaged with enemy hostiles to the legacy of courage, valor service and sacrifice that our predecessors left us. These Airmen, like all Airmen, stand on the shoulders of giants like Billy Mitchell, Arnold, Chennault, Doolittle, Lemay and Schriever.” He concluded by saying, “Today we recognize these six amazing Airmen for their combat roles as warriors wielding the air power bequeathed to us by these giants.”Following the ceremony, Black told the audience, “It’s a great honor anytime you’re recognized for your efforts, but I don’t look at it as heroic. I’m proud to represent all of the Airmen who will receive this award.”Since that day in 2001 that established Black’s legacy, she has become a master navigator with more than 1,500 flying hours and 540 combat hours during Operation Enduring Freedom.During a recent CNN interview with Black, concerning the president’s announcement to open all military career fields to women, she commented that, “I think it there’s going to be the standard and the standard needs to remain the same. You need to be physically, mentally and technically capable to do whatever job it is. And if you can meet those standards, bring it. You know, gender aside, we have to prepare our forces for the future fight. And it’s dynamic. It’s evolving, everchanging. So introducing women into those key roles will be might be that critical punch we need to deliver to the future enemy.”An example that the Afghan general back in 2001 predicted for women of his own country: “Look at what America allows their women to do. One day our country will have similar freedoms.”

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